How to Read a Book a Day by Jordan Harry #reading #books #study #JordanHarry

After a childhood speech impediment left him struggling to read, Jordan learned strategies from world leading speed readers to dramatically enhance his reading ability. Jordan now helps others unleash their potential to learn anything faster. Because he knew that spending hours reading books and watching seminars was not as effective as it could be. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

That Oxford Girl: A Real Student’s Guide to Oxford University #books #Oxford #edchat #UCAS

Ever wondered what it’s like to study at Oxford University? Former student and famous blogger Tilly Rose, a.k.a. ‘that Oxford girl’, gives you all the insider tips on what to expect at one of the world’s top universities.

Follow Tilly as she steers you through everything – from applying to Oxford, choosing a college, and preparing for interviews, to college life, the different societies and student events on offer, and coping with study commitments.

This is a fun and accessible guide, packed full of quirky illustrations and beautiful photographs of the colleges and the city itself, giving you a truly unique insight into what it’s really like to be a student at Oxford University.

Cleverlands by Lucy Crehan – The Secrets Behind the Success of the World’s Education Superpowers #books #education #teaching #learning #teachers

As a teacher in an inner-city school, Lucy Crehan was exasperated with ever-changing government policy claiming to be based on lessons from ‘top-performing’ education systems. She resolved to find out what was really going on in the classrooms of countries whose teenagers ranked top in the world in reading, maths and science.

Cleverlands documents Crehan’s journey around the world, weaving together her experiences with research on policy, history, psychology and culture to offer extensive new insights into what we can learn from these countries.

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Invite Nutrition guru Tina Lond-Caulk to talk at your school #Nutrition #Education #Talks #Surrey #London #Health

These motivating and inspirational talks focus on how being conscious of our food choices and making simple healthy changes can have profound, positive effects on every one of us and every aspect of our lives, almost immediately. It moves listeners to want to improve their diet as they walk out of the door. Our teen years can be a stressful time, students learn how to manage their stress, sleep, energy levels, immunity and recognise their own deficiency symptoms during these effective workshops.

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100 Ideas for Secondary Teachers: Engaging Learners (100 Ideas for Teachers) #Books #Teaching #Learning #Lessonplanning

Are your students really engaged in your teaching? Teachers everywhere are looking for quick and easy ways to liven up their lessons, try something new and exciting, or just tweak a strategy or practice that they have been doing for years. This is a recipe style books that you can dip in and out of when you are looking for inspiration. 100 Ideas for Secondary Teachers: Engaging Learners contains techniques and activities to apply to every area of classroom teaching, from livening up displays to using technology effectively, and even includes advice on greeting students and providing motivational feedback. Put these ideas into practice to get your class engaged and ready to learn.

Talks and activities in your school or college – University of Bath #Bath #University

We can offer talks, workshops and activities for year 11, 12 and 13 students to help prepare them for the transition to university.

Talks and workshops

You can arrange a talk or workshop for your year 11, 12 and 13 students to help support their journey to university. We can tailor talks to meet your specific needs, and can offer them during school hours, or at parents’ evenings.

Depending on demand, we may be able to offer talks in the following areas:

  • choosing A level subjects (Year 11)
  • choosing a course (Year 12)
  • applying for competitive courses (Year 12/13 and parents)
  • UCAS applications and personal statements (Year 12/13)
  • getting ready for university: arriving and surviving (Year 13)
  • why choose the University of Bath? (Year 12/13)
  • student life (Year 12/13)
  • student finance (Year 12/13 and parents)

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Science and Maths by Primrose Kitten #Physics #Maths #Tutorials

I want to help you achieve the grades you (and I) know you are capable of; these grades are the stepping stone to your future. Even if you don’t want to study science or maths further, the grades you get now will open doors in the future.

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Primose Kitten

Why School INSET persistently fails to raise teaching and learning standards. #Education #Books #Schools #INEST

I would preface my remarks here by saying that the basis for my observations in this article come from practice in the UK. However, conversations with colleagues in Australia, Canada and the United States suggest the same features appear in their systems.

In the UK 1988 was a decisive turning point in education history. The Education Reform Act introduced by Kenneth Baker introduced many new features to the learning and teaching landscape and has shaped development for the last thirty years.

The first and possibly most negative aspect was the introduction of the National Curriculum.  This attempted to codify WHAT was to be taught to every student across their student career. It set the education direction as being primarily concerned with curriculum content.

The world, his wife and all their relations were invited to contribute to the National Curriculum and the result was an overly bloated curriculum, often lacking relevance or coherence. The mantra of the time was that the curriculum should be ‘broad and balanced’, which it was. Unfortunately everyone knew what they wanted in the curriculum, but no-one could agree what should be dropped to accommodate it!

The second great innovation was the advent of five days per school year set aside for the In Service Training of Teachers (INSET). Initially, this was a very popular innovation with teachers, as it recognised their requirement to have days of professional study, development an interaction (this was less popular with parents who had to find five extra days of childcare!).

Having previously had no statutory professional development days, school leadership teams were free to invent their own professional development programme and some were very innovative. Initially there was some funding called TVEI (Technical and Vocational Educational Initiative) designed to encourage collaborations and some schools coordinated their INSET days to enable staff to attend events in a number of schools.

Within that sentence was the major issue with INSET days. They became a stage-managed EVENT which, for the most part still holds true today.  Rather than addressing issues at a fundamental cultural level, the pattern of the day fragmented around what came to be a familiar pattern. The school, apart from those staff on externally accredited external courses, would have their professional development opportunities constrained to this five day model.

The first element, usually occupying the early part of the day was an inspirational visiting speaker, the content of whose talk may, or may not have had any bearing on the development priorities of the school. The talk element meant that the teachers for the most part were passive participants in the process.  Many would describe the experience of the guest speaker as seeing their favourite comedian live… intensely engaging, compelling, humorous and insightful. But the next day, they could not recall what they had heard and it certainly was not going to impact on their practice on a daily basis.

Following the talk there would be some pressing whole school based business such as the implications of new national initiatives on school processes, or some urgent training related to pupil welfare or health.

The afternoon session, when most people were soporific after a good lunch, tended to be devoted to curriculum/departmental time when rather than moving the school forward, teachers were engaged in preparing for the term starting the next day, or closing down the term just past. Important administrative work indeed, but not work designed to professionally challenge and develop teachers.

There was no PROCESS in these events, no reflection and development, little sharing of practice, good, developing or bad and no centrality of the learner in planning.

I’ve observed this as a trainer, guest speaker, school leader and departmental head across the country. The same meagre developmental diet served up repeatedly despite the lack of impact.

Given these experiences I began working on a different approach to teacher professional development. You will notice I avoid the word training from this point, as I believe training has unfortunate connotations and impacts.

Over several years I pulled a template together for a model of Continuous Professional Development that any school could adopt and adapt to suit their development purposes.

The model works irrespective of context, cultural, national or sector.

I’ve been able to condense over a decade work of development work into a coherent whole in a book to be published in March 2019.

Please contact me if you would like to know more, including some sample templates for how to implement the model to address the quality of teaching and learning in your school.

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