100 Ideas for Primary Teachers: Coding (100 Ideas for Teachers) #Books #Education #Coding #Primary

Coding comprises half of the National Curriculum strands for computing, and 100 Ideas for Primary Teachers: Coding is packed with resources that will give every teacher confidence when delivering it. The easy-to-follow and practical activities in this book will be invaluable for all teachers, whether new to coding and getting to grips with the basics, or experienced and wanting to expand their repertoire. All the ideas have been carefully selected and written to be appropriate for the widest range of pupils ages and abilities, and to be used with most coding platforms and devices making them compatible with any existing scheme. Readers can also access and download additional free resources and templates online 100 ideas is just the start!

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That Oxford Girl: A Real Student’s Guide to Oxford University #books #Oxford #edchat #UCAS

Ever wondered what it’s like to study at Oxford University? Former student and famous blogger Tilly Rose, a.k.a. ‘that Oxford girl’, gives you all the insider tips on what to expect at one of the world’s top universities.

Follow Tilly as she steers you through everything – from applying to Oxford, choosing a college, and preparing for interviews, to college life, the different societies and student events on offer, and coping with study commitments.

This is a fun and accessible guide, packed full of quirky illustrations and beautiful photographs of the colleges and the city itself, giving you a truly unique insight into what it’s really like to be a student at Oxford University.

Cleverlands by Lucy Crehan – The Secrets Behind the Success of the World’s Education Superpowers #books #education #teaching #learning #teachers

As a teacher in an inner-city school, Lucy Crehan was exasperated with ever-changing government policy claiming to be based on lessons from ‘top-performing’ education systems. She resolved to find out what was really going on in the classrooms of countries whose teenagers ranked top in the world in reading, maths and science.

Cleverlands documents Crehan’s journey around the world, weaving together her experiences with research on policy, history, psychology and culture to offer extensive new insights into what we can learn from these countries.

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100 Ideas for Secondary Teachers: Engaging Learners (100 Ideas for Teachers) #Books #Teaching #Learning #Lessonplanning

Are your students really engaged in your teaching? Teachers everywhere are looking for quick and easy ways to liven up their lessons, try something new and exciting, or just tweak a strategy or practice that they have been doing for years. This is a recipe style books that you can dip in and out of when you are looking for inspiration. 100 Ideas for Secondary Teachers: Engaging Learners contains techniques and activities to apply to every area of classroom teaching, from livening up displays to using technology effectively, and even includes advice on greeting students and providing motivational feedback. Put these ideas into practice to get your class engaged and ready to learn.

Why School INSET persistently fails to raise teaching and learning standards. #Education #Books #Schools #INEST

I would preface my remarks here by saying that the basis for my observations in this article come from practice in the UK. However, conversations with colleagues in Australia, Canada and the United States suggest the same features appear in their systems.

In the UK 1988 was a decisive turning point in education history. The Education Reform Act introduced by Kenneth Baker introduced many new features to the learning and teaching landscape and has shaped development for the last thirty years.

The first and possibly most negative aspect was the introduction of the National Curriculum.  This attempted to codify WHAT was to be taught to every student across their student career. It set the education direction as being primarily concerned with curriculum content.

The world, his wife and all their relations were invited to contribute to the National Curriculum and the result was an overly bloated curriculum, often lacking relevance or coherence. The mantra of the time was that the curriculum should be ‘broad and balanced’, which it was. Unfortunately everyone knew what they wanted in the curriculum, but no-one could agree what should be dropped to accommodate it!

The second great innovation was the advent of five days per school year set aside for the In Service Training of Teachers (INSET). Initially, this was a very popular innovation with teachers, as it recognised their requirement to have days of professional study, development an interaction (this was less popular with parents who had to find five extra days of childcare!).

Having previously had no statutory professional development days, school leadership teams were free to invent their own professional development programme and some were very innovative. Initially there was some funding called TVEI (Technical and Vocational Educational Initiative) designed to encourage collaborations and some schools coordinated their INSET days to enable staff to attend events in a number of schools.

Within that sentence was the major issue with INSET days. They became a stage-managed EVENT which, for the most part still holds true today.  Rather than addressing issues at a fundamental cultural level, the pattern of the day fragmented around what came to be a familiar pattern. The school, apart from those staff on externally accredited external courses, would have their professional development opportunities constrained to this five day model.

The first element, usually occupying the early part of the day was an inspirational visiting speaker, the content of whose talk may, or may not have had any bearing on the development priorities of the school. The talk element meant that the teachers for the most part were passive participants in the process.  Many would describe the experience of the guest speaker as seeing their favourite comedian live… intensely engaging, compelling, humorous and insightful. But the next day, they could not recall what they had heard and it certainly was not going to impact on their practice on a daily basis.

Following the talk there would be some pressing whole school based business such as the implications of new national initiatives on school processes, or some urgent training related to pupil welfare or health.

The afternoon session, when most people were soporific after a good lunch, tended to be devoted to curriculum/departmental time when rather than moving the school forward, teachers were engaged in preparing for the term starting the next day, or closing down the term just past. Important administrative work indeed, but not work designed to professionally challenge and develop teachers.

There was no PROCESS in these events, no reflection and development, little sharing of practice, good, developing or bad and no centrality of the learner in planning.

I’ve observed this as a trainer, guest speaker, school leader and departmental head across the country. The same meagre developmental diet served up repeatedly despite the lack of impact.

Given these experiences I began working on a different approach to teacher professional development. You will notice I avoid the word training from this point, as I believe training has unfortunate connotations and impacts.

Over several years I pulled a template together for a model of Continuous Professional Development that any school could adopt and adapt to suit their development purposes.

The model works irrespective of context, cultural, national or sector.

I’ve been able to condense over a decade work of development work into a coherent whole in a book to be published in March 2019.

Please contact me if you would like to know more, including some sample templates for how to implement the model to address the quality of teaching and learning in your school.

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The Danish Way of Parenting #Books #Parenting #Education

‘A shining alternative to high-stress modern parenting, and families from New Delhi to New York will shout with joy’ Heather Shumaker, author of It’s OK Not to Share and It’s OK to Go Up the Slide

DISCOVER THE PARENTING SECRETS OF THE HAPPIEST PEOPLE IN THE WORLD

What makes Denmark the happiest country in the world — and how do Danish parents raise happy, confident, successful kids, year after year? This upbeat and practical guide reveals the six essential principles that have been working for parents in Denmark for decades:

– Play: essential for development and well-being
– Authenticity: fosters trust and an ‘inner compass’
– Reframing: helps kids cope with setbacks and look on the bright side
– Empathy: allows us to act with kindness towards others
– No ultimatums: no power struggles or resentment
– Togetherness: a way to celebrate family time, on special occasions and every day

A revealing and fresh take on parenting advice, The Danish Way of Parenting will help parents from all walks of life raise the happiest, most well-adjusted kids in the world.

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Ten good reads for teachers #Teaching #Books #Education

Plato’s Republic, Rousseau’s Émile and Dewey’s Democracy and Education – there’s a strong case to be made, as Dennis Hayes has, that these are the only books on education that teachers need to read.

But if I was about to enter the classroom as a teacher for the first time or was looking to improve my practice, I would probably want to read something with more practical advice on what I should be doing and, more importantly, on what I shouldn’t.

Much of what happens in a classroom is highly variable and hard to define, but over the last 10 years a wealth of books has sought to draw together evidence from other fields and provide a series of “best bets” on what might have the greatest impact on student learning. Here are just a few of them.

Read on from The Guardian

Outstanding Teaching: Teaching Backwards #Education #Teaching #Books

n an era when schools and teachers often seem to operate at one hundred miles an hour, Teaching Backwards offers a more reflective and measured approach to teaching and learning. Where many teachers focus on delivering content in a linear fashion, those who teach backwards start with the end in mind. This means that they know in advance what levels of knowledge, attitude, skills and habits they expect their learners to achieve, they define and demystify ambitious goals, and they establish their students starting points before they start to plan and teach. Teaching Backwards ensures that learners consistently make great progress over time, and offers a practical, hands-on manual for teachers to further develop their attitudes, skills and habits of excellence both for themselves and for their learners.

This book is the follow-up to the best-selling Outstanding Teaching: Engaging Learners. It is based on the analysis of thousands of hours of primary and secondary lessons, part of Osiris Education s Outstanding Teaching Intervention p rogramme over the last seven years.

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The 4-Hour Chef: The Simple Path to Cooking Like a Pro, Learning Anything, and Living the Good Life #Learning #Education

WHAT IF YOU COULD BECOME WORLD-CLASS IN ANYTHING IN 6 MONTHS OR LESS?

The 4-Hour Chef isn’t just a cookbook. It’s a choose-your-own-adventure guide to the world of rapid learning.

#1 New York Times bestselling author (and lifelong non-cook) Tim Ferriss takes you from Manhattan to Okinawa, and from Silicon Valley to Calcutta, unearthing the secrets of the world’s fastest learners and greatest chefs. Ferriss uses cooking to explain “meta-learning,” a step-by-step process that can be used to master anything, whether searing steak or shooting 3-pointers in basketball. That is the real “recipe” of The 4-Hour Chef.

You’ll train inside the kitchen for everything outside the kitchen. Featuring tips and tricks from chess prodigies, world-renowned chefs, pro athletes, master sommeliers, super models, and everyone in between, this “cookbook for people who don’t buy cookbooks” is a guide to mastering cooking and life.

The 4-Hour Chef is a five-stop journey through the art and science of learning:

1. META-LEARNING. Before you learn to cook, you must learn to learn. META charts the path to doubling your learning potential.

2. THE DOMESTIC. DOM is where you learn the building blocks of cooking. These are the ABCs (techniques) that can take you from Dr, Seuss to Shakespeare.

3. THE WILD. Becoming a master student requires self-sufficiency in all things. WILD teaches you to hunt, forage, and survive.

4. THE SCIENTIST. SCI is the mad scientist and modernist painter wrapped into one. This is where you rediscover whimsy and wonder.

5. THE PROFESSIONAL. Swaraj, a term usually associated with Mahatma Gandhi, can be translated as “self-rule.” In PRO, we’ll look at how the best in the world become the best in the world, and how you can chart your own path far beyond this book.

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The Lazy Student’s Revision Guide: Study Hacks For Exam Success Without The Stress #revision #exams #education

Are your exams fast approaching? Are you starting to panic that you’re never going to be ready for them?

You’re not alone.

It’s an unfortunate truth that good study technique is rarely taught in schools, colleges or universities.

Which is where The Lazy Student’s Revision Guide comes in.

This book is packed full of study hacks that take you through the revision process in a concise and easy-to-read manner. I understand that you don’t have time to sit and read a 300 page manual on how to pass your exams. Let’s face it; if you did, then you could make a start on that pile of textbooks in front of you…

This book is for students looking for a no-nonsense, step-by-step guide to revision that has actionable advice to get you started soon.

In this guide you’ll learn how to:

  • Make sure you’re physically and mentally prepared to study successfully
  • Create a revision timetable that you’ll actually be able to stick to
  • Avoid information overload and focus your studies on the things you need to know to ace your exams
  • Produce top quality revision notes that you’ll use again and again
  • Prepare for your exams without letting revision take over your life

The study tips, tricks and hacks in The Lazy Student’s Revision Guide are proven to improve exam performance. All you need to do to get the results you deserve is follow the steps in this guide.

Can you really afford to waste another day on revision techniques that might not even be working?

Read this book, apply the techniques you learn and you’re guaranteed better exam results than you ever thought were possible.

What other students have said about The Lazy Student’s Revision Guide:

“I have recently finished my mock exams and I now know that I have been studying a little wrong! The Lazy Student’s Revision Guide is very well written and is very informative. People who are about to start revising for exams need to know what to do and how to do it and this book does exactly that!”

Lara Taylor

“This book is a MUST read for students! As a student myself (and a lazy one at that) it has given me helpful tips and tricks to becoming a more successful student! A+++”

Rachel Wilson

“Enlightening read from an intelligent author who clearly knows what he’s talking about. This book has been a great help for me during my studies and I would recommend it to anyone and everyone who has no idea how they should even start revision. A quick read and the step-by-step process makes it very easy to follow.”